Cleaning


Cleaning Child Restraints

Cleaning child restraints is a grueling job but it has to be done to prolong the life of your child's car seat. Food may stop parts from working. Use the steps below to correctly clean your car seat. Never use chemicals.

Cleaning the buckle

Cleaning the cover

Cleaning the seat shell

Storing seats when not in use

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Cleaning the buckle

  1. Remove buckle from restraint shell, unthread carefully.
  2. Rinse under warm water for 5 or so minutes.
  3. Engage and release the buckle a number of times until a strong click is heard.
  4. Repeat rinse if no click is heard or buckle is still sticking.
  5. Ensure you re-fit the buckle straps into the shell correctly. Refer to your restraint instructions for more info.
  6. Use only mild soap and water to clean plastic and metal parts of the seat.
  7. Rinse buckle with warm water. DO NOT use household detergents Never lubricate the buckle.
  8. Replace buckle correctly into restraint. 

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Cleaning the harness

  1. Surface wash only with mild soap and damp cloth.
  2. If harness straps are frayed or heavily soiled, they MUST be replaced.
  3. Manufacturers will not offer replacement parts for seats over 10 years of age.

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Cleaning the cover

  1. The harness and crotch strap will need to be removed before removing the cover.
  2. Machine-wash separately on gentle cycle and machine-dry on cool air setting or line dry.
  3. Where possible try to sponge down the seat as soon as a spill has happened, or soon after to avoid marking and damage to the seat.

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Cleaning the seat shell

  1. Wipe with mild solution of soap and water only.
  2. Avoid wetting labels.
  3. DO NOT use household detergents, doing so will weaken the plastic.
  4. Ensure excess water is wiped up with a towel and not left in components of the restraint.
  5. Use only mild soap and water to clean plastic and metal parts of the seat.
  6. Replace the cover and harness once the seat has been cleaned. (Never use the car seat without the cover or harness). Ensure this is done correctly, if you are unsure check your restraint manual, or contact the manufacturer for assistance.

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Storing the car seat

When a child restraint is not in use, many people chose to store it in the garage. The heat in a garage at times may exceed that of inside the home, and many garages allow sunlight through which means that the seat is being exposed to dangerous UV sunlight which will slowly but surely damage the plastic shell of the seat, it can also dehydrate the seat which means the cover and belts become very stale and stiff, and are more likely to tear in an accident.
Therefore storing in the garage, attic, basement or similar is not advised. 

It would be best to store the seat in the plastic bag or box that the seat come with and store it in a room in the house that is regularly aired, and not likely to be humid or damp, such as in a child's bedroom wardrobe.

Keeping the seat wrapped and in the original box also reduces the chances of household pets or pests getting into the seat and damaging belts and covers or urinating on the seat.

Alternatively you can purchase a universal car seat cover, some covers double up as transport bags which allow the seat to be transported which is ideal for flying when the seat is checked in as cargo. Some covers have the ability to be turned inside out and used a cover while the seat is in the car, so that the seat remains cool while in the car, preventing burns and discomfort.